Posts Tagged: "other barks and bites"

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, August 14: Arthrex Files Reply at Supreme Court, Skidmore Appeals to SCOTUS in “Stairway to Heaven” Case, and Texas Jury Awards $506 Million Verdict Against Apple

This week in Other Barks & Bites: Arthrex files a reply in its Supreme Court case regarding the constitutionality of PTAB appointments, while another SCOTUS petition was filed to appeal the Ninth Circuit’s ruling in the “Stairway to Heaven” copyright case; the Federal Circuit affirms an examiner’s obviousness rejection of monotype printing patent claims and also upholds sanctions against a pair of doctors for procedural issues stemming from more than 300 patent complaints filed in district court; the D.C. Circuit remands part of a royalty rate setting proceeding on streaming music distribution to the Copyright Royalty Board; a jury verdict in Eastern Texas awards $506 million to PanOptis for Apple’s willful infringement of patent claims; the TTAB sustains an opposition against “gruyere” for genericness; and the Federal Reserve announces that it has undertaken several initiatives related to central bank digital currencies.

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, August 7: USPTO Increases Fees for Patent Filings and AIA Trials, State AGs Ask HHS to March-In on Remdesivir, CAFC Denies American Axle Rehearing

This week in Other Barks & Bites: the Federal Circuit denies petitions for en banc rehearing in a pair of patent cases regarding Section 101 eligibility and holds that the essentiality of patent claims to a standard is a question of fact for the jury; a letter signed by 34 state attorneys general asks U.S. federal health agencies to exercise march-in rights under Bayh-Dole on Gilead’s remdesivir; the USPTO issues final rules for agency fee adjustments, including a $3,500 increase to IPR petitions; the release of Reels on Instagram helps Mark Zuckerberg become the world’s third-richest person; the Western Washington district court denies an interlocutory appeal on a theory of copyright infringement for Amazon “making available” copyrighted sound recordings; former Google engineer Anthony Levandowski is sentenced to 18 months in prison for trade secret theft; and a Chinese patent owner files a patent suit against Apple’s Siri voice assistant feature seeking $1.43 billion USD in damages.

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, July 10: China Patent Filings Increase Despite COVID-19, CJEU Says Government Committees Subject to GDPR and CAFC Revives Part of Uniloc Motion to Seal in Apple Patent Case

This week in Other Barks & Bites: the Federal Circuit extends Arthrex to ex parte appeals and vacates part of a denial of a motion to seal filed by Uniloc related to third-party licensee information; the CJEU says that copyright owners can only request postal addresses of people posting infringing content online, and that government committees are subject to personal data access provisions of the EU General Data Protection Regulation; the CNIPA releases statistics showing that, despite a slowdown during COVID-19, Chinese patent application filings during 2020’s first half have increased by about 5% relative to the same period last year; the USPTO extends its pilot program for faster processing of patent applications related to cancer immunotherapies; Intel fails to axe Qualcomm patent claims in a trio of IPRs decided by the PTAB this week; and Gartner reports that global PC shipments are up by about 2.8% thanks to increased mobile demand.This week in Other Barks & Bites: the Federal Circuit extends Arthrex to ex parte appeals and vacates part of a denial of a motion to seal filed by Uniloc related to third-party licensee information; the CJEU says that copyright owners can only request postal addresses of people posting infringing content online, and that government committees are subject to personal data access provisions of the EU General Data Protection Regulation; the CNIPA releases statistics showing that, despite a slowdown during COVID-19, Chinese patent application filings during 2020’s first half have increased by about 5% relative to the same period last year; the USPTO extends its pilot program for faster processing of patent applications related to cancer immunotherapies; Intel fails to axe Qualcomm patent claims in a trio of IPRs decided by the PTAB this week; and Gartner reports that global PC shipments are up by about 2.8% thanks to increased mobile demand.

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, June 26: SCOTUS Denies Cert to PTAB Challenges, CAFC Issues Three New Precedential Patent Decisions, and Ninth Circuit Revives The Shape of Water Copyright Case

This week in Other Barks & Bites: the House of Representatives approves a bill by voice vote which would enable the sale of acceleration certificates for patent applications in the Patents for Humanity Program; the Supreme Court denies cert to a trio of petitions challenging the Patent Trial and Appeal Board as unconstitutional under the Fifth Amendment’s Takings Clause; the Copyright Office begins accepting petitions for temporary exemptions to Section 1201 of the DMCA; the CAFC issues three new precedential decisions; the Ninth Circuit reverses the dismissal of copyright claims over The Shape of Water and also reverses a lower court for an erroneous jury instruction modeled after the Ninth Circuit’s own model instructions on functionality in trademark law; Gilead’s remdesivir is endorsed as the first antiviral treatment for use against COVID-19 in Europe; and the USPTO requests comments from past participants in its GIPA Training Programs.

This Week in Other Barks & Bites for Friday, April 3: PTO and Copyright Office Extend Deadlines, Canada Coronavirus Law Includes Patent Circumventions

This week: the COVID-19 pandemic causes USPTO and Copyright Office to extend deadlines while the FCC embarks on a pair of telehealth and connected care initiatives to support health care providers; Europe’s highest court finds Amazon isn’t liable for trademark infringing by storing infringing goods from third-party sellers; Tesla forecasts 500,000 car deliveries in 2020 after beat analyst expectations on sales for the first quarter; a Stanford Law paper co-authored by Mark Lemley shows outsized negative impacts of Supreme Court’s Alice ruling on startups and individual inventors; Zoom announces massive increase in its daily meeting participant numbers; USPTO announces plans to expand its Law School Clinic Certification Program; and Canada passes emergency legislation for coronavirus response giving government the authority to compel manufacturing of any patented technology. 

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, March 13: Federal Circuit, Copyright Office, Ninth Circuit Brace for Coronavirus Concerns; Huawei Tops EU Patent Applicants; Apple Pays VirnetX

This week in Other Barks & Bites: Fears over coronavirus tank stocks on Wall Street and trigger changes at the Federal Circuit, the closure of the Library of Congress and the U.S. Copyright Office, as well as move the location of oral arguments in the Ninth Circuit; INTA has had to reschedule its Annual Meeting for November and combine it with the Association’s Leadership Meeting due to the coronavirus; the Senate IP Subcommittee looks at the applicability of the European Union Copyright Directive for the U.S. copyright regime; the University of Texas files a petition for writ with the Supreme Court arguing that TC Heartland destroys state sovereign immunity; Huawei tops the list of EPO patent applicants for 2019; IBM takes Airbnb to court over e-commerce patents; the Trademark Modernization Act is introduced into Congress to expedite the cancellation of fraudulent trademarks; and the Department of Defense asks the Court of Federal Claims for time to reconsider its cloud computing contract with Microsoft.

Other Barks & Bites, Friday, January 31: Apple/ Broadcom Hit With $1.1 Billion Jury Verdict, Greta Thunberg Seeks Trademark Protection, and Bloomberg Supports Drug Patent Limits

This week in Other Barks & Bites: a California jury awards Caltech $1.1 billion in patent damages against Apple and Broadcom; the Federal Circuit affirms a PTAB obviousness finding based on combination of prior art and general knowledge; Democratic candidate Bloomberg supports limitations to patent protections for brand-name drugs; climate activist Greta Thunberg seeks trademark protection; the EU Court of Justice determines that computer software trademarks aren’t contrary to public policy; the UKIPO discusses agency operations during post-Brexit transition period; IBM announces Arvind Krishna as replacement for outgoing CEO Ginni Rometty; USPTO announces partnership to fast-track Mexican patent applications for U.S. patent owners; and the UK decides to shelve EU Copyright Directive on eve of Brexit.

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, December 13: U.S. and China Move Towards Trade Deal, Register Temple Leaves Copyright Office, and Tillis Sends Letters on Copyright Issues

This week in Other Barks & Bites: Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC) gets active on copyright matters, signing a trio of letters related to piracy and Copyright Office matters; Karyn Temple leaves her post as Register of Copyrights at the Copyright Office; the Supreme Court decides Peters v. NantKwest, finding that the USPTO can’t recover legal personnel fees in district court proceedings; Facebook shares drop due to a potential Federal Trade Commission injunction against messaging services integration; the Federal Circuit denies a rehearing petition on Capital One’s antitrust claims against Intellectual Ventures; House Democrats allow the USCMA free trade agreement to move towards ratification; news reports indicate that the U.S. and China have a limited trade deal in place; and the EU rules that marijuana-related trademarks are contrary to public policy. 

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, March 1

This week in Other Barks and Bites: the Senate Judiciary Committee plans to go after drug patents to promote access to generic medications; Apple faces another patent suit in the Eastern District of Texas in the midst of attempts to remove its business presence from the district; China enacts a code of conduct for patent agents; Samsung and Huawei enter into an agreement to terminate their multi-year legal battle in the Android sector; the makers of Fortnite face yet another copyright suit over dance moves; Warner Bros. strikes down a Kickstarter campaign intending to distribute edited versions of The Departed; and a Delaware jury upholds cholesterol treatment patents owned by Amgen.