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Steve Brachmann

Steve Brachmann is a graduate of the University at Buffalo School of Law, having earned his Juris Doctor in May 2022 and served as the President of the Intellectual Property Law Society during the 2021-22 school year. He currently works as a freelancer on research projects, blogging and media consulting and is accepting offers to work. Steve has written on intellectual property topics since January 2013. Other than IPWatchdog, Steve’s work has also been published by the Center for Intellectual Property Understanding, and he has worked as a ghostwriter on IP topics for several entities. Currently living in Buffalo, NY, Steve also works as a stage actor and pet sitter.

Recent Articles by Steve Brachmann

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, November 25: Seventh Circuit Nixes Publicity Claim Against Subscriber List Sale, Copyright Office and USPTO Announce NFT Study, and Alia Moses Takes Over as Chief Judge of Western Texas

This week in Other Barks & Bites: U.S. District Judge Alia Moses officially takes over as the Chief Judge as the Western District of Texas; the U.S. Supreme Court takes up Jack Daniel’s appeal of the First Amendment ruling in favor of VIP Products’ whiskey bottle-shaped dog toys; the World Intellectual Property Organization announces that two-thirds of all patent applications were filed in Asian IP offices during 2021; Senators Cruz and Cantwell introduce a bill directing the FTC to create required disclosures on recording capabilities for smart devices; the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the U.S. Copyright Office announce a joint study on non-fungible tokens; IBM files a copyright infringement suit against Micro Focus for its unauthorized use of IBM’s mainframe software; and the Seventh Circuit nixes a right of publicity claim under Illinois state law after finding that the sale of a magazine subscriber list did not involve the use of the plaintiff’s identity to complete a commercial purpose.

Unauthorized Hamilton Production Underscores Issues with Unlicensed, Infringing Staged Theatrical Productions

This August, the Door Christian Fellowship McAllen Church made some unfortunate headlines after it came to light that the church had produced and staged a performance that made unauthorized use of original works from the blockbuster Broadway musical, Hamilton. By the end of the month, The Door had issued an apology for the unauthorized performances and agreed to pay damages and destroy any recordings of the staged performance in respect of the intellectual property protections of Hamilton’s creators. While this unlicensed and infringing use was quickly dealt with by Hamilton’s legal team, there have been other instances of recalcitrant producers who have only been held accountable for staging unlicensed theatrical works after years of infringement.

OpenSky: ‘There Was No Harm’ Stemming From Offer to Manipulate VLSI Proceedings

On November 17, patent owner VLSI Technology and petitioner OpenSky Industries each filed briefs at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in response to Director Kathi Vidal’s order for OpenSky to show cause as to why it should not be required to pay attorney’s fees to compensate for its abuse of inter partes review (IPR) proceedings at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB). While VLSI argues that OpenSky should be ordered to compensate all attorney’s fees and costs incurred from each IPR petition encouraged by OpenSky’s own petition filing activities, OpenSky argues that Director Vidal’s order to show cause fails to identify any compensable harm stemming from OpenSky’s IPR conduct.

Other Barks & Bites for Friday, November 18: Canada’s Supreme Court Affirms ‘Springboard’ Profits Award for Dow, VLSI Wins Another Massive Verdict Against Intel, and Ninth Circuit Says Director Service Applies to Court Proceedings

This week in Other Barks & Bites: the Ninth Circuit rules that service on the USPTO Director under Section 1051(e) for reaching foreign-domiciled defendants applies in U.S. district court proceedings; the Federal Circuit restores a patent claim owned by VLSI Technology on the same day that a Western Texas jury enters a $948 million verdict for VLSI against Intel; the Eighth Circuit affirms a summary judgment ruling that Pocket Plus’ asserted trade dress is functional; the European Patent Office will begin transitional measures on unitary patents for patent applicants on January 1 of next year; major tech firms including Amazon and Twitter have been shedding large amounts of employees; AMD and Analog Devices announce a settlement agreement ending ongoing patent litigation between the firms; and the Supreme Court of Canada affirms a damages award for patent infringement including “springboard” profits earned by the infringer after the asserted patent rights expired.