Logan Murr Image

Logan Murr

Lega Intern

Calyx Law

Logan Murr is an Associate at Calyx Law who has contributed to IPWatchdog since 2021. He graduated Franklin Pierce Center for IP in 2022 and attended Susquehanna University, where he studied Neuroscience. While in law school, Logan gained experience working on trademark issues and patent matters spanning multiple technological domains.

In his prior roles, Logan has had the opportunity to conduct patentability and marketability searches, draft both patent and trademark applications, and assist in drafting licensing agreements.

While at Franklin Pierce, Logan served as the Senior Editor of IDEA: The Law Review of the Franklin Pierce Center for IP, and was Director of Events for the UNH Patent Law Forum.

Logan brings a unique skill set and passion for science and innovation to his role as Associate at Calyx Law. With a desire to promote a broader understanding of psychedelics and their healing potential, Logan hopes to help to drive progress in the psychedelic industry.

Recent Articles by Logan Murr

Dangerous Fakes: Infringing Products That Pose Public Health Issues

During the final day of IPWatchdog LIVE in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, a panel of attorneys discussed issues surrounding “dangerous fakes,” which are counterfeit goods that pose health risks to consumers. The panelists began with a brief overview of how U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) identifies and seizes infringing goods. The panel also outlined the role that U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) plays in working to identify dangerous fakes in conjunction with CBP.

Litigating Patents in Texas: IPWatchdog LIVE Panel Notes Order Curbing Albright May Soon Be Revoked

During Day two of IPWatchdog LIVE in Dallas, Texas, a panel of attorneys discussed a range of topics related to litigating patents in Texas, particularly the recent order from the Chief Judge for the Western District of Texas, which requires patent cases filed in the Waco Divison to be randomly assigned to one of 12 district court judges. The order was widely understood to be an answer to Senator Tillis’ recent criticism of Judge Alan Albright. The panel began with a discussion of a law review article written by Baylor law student, Matthew Vitale, which analyzed the witness lists of tried cases that were transferred from Texas to either the Northern or Central District of California and the Western District of Washington. The analysis concluded that only single digit percentages of witnesses listed in motions to transfer were ever called to testify. The panelists noted that this finding supports the notion that witness lists contained in motions to transfer are often merely a pretext to obtain a transfer.

Panelists Highlight Increased Capital, Importance of Foreign Patents for U.S. Patent Monetization at IPWatchdog LIVE 2022

During day one of IPWatchdog LIVE in Dallas, Texas, a panel of speakers discussing current trends and the prospects of patent monetization going forward noted that the “heyday” of patent monetization was approximately ten years ago, with several large patent awards increasing interest in patent monetization. The panelists noted two major factors which presently act as a “glass ceiling” over patent valuations. First, the inter partes review (IPR) proceedings instituted at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in 2012 as part of the America Invents Act (AIA) has made investment in patents a riskier proposition.

CJEU Advocate General Recommends Clarifying What Constitutes Trademark ‘Use’ by Online Intermediaries

On June 2, the Court of Justice of the European Union issued a press release discussing the results of the Advocate General’s opinion on two actions filed by French footwear designer Christian Louboutin, one in Luxembourg and another in Belgium, against the Amazon group (Amazon) alleging trademark infringement. As detailed in the opinion, Amazon regularly advertises red-soled platform shoes which are for sale on its platform without the consent of Louboutin. Louboutin is the owner of the EU position mark referred to as the “red sole” for goods in International Class 25 covering “high-heeled shoes (and other orthopedic footwear).” The mark at issue “consists of the colour red (Pantone 18-1663TP) applied to the sole of a shoe.” Louboutin also has national protection for the mark in both Belgium and Luxembourg.

CAFC Dismisses Appeal of PTAB Determination Because it Partially Involved Time-Bar

On May 13, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit dismissed Bennett Regulator Guards, Inc.’s (Bennett) challenge of a Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) decision to vacate the institution of an inter partes review (IPR), citing a lack of jurisdiction, since the PTAB’s decision was based in part on its reconsideration of whether the petitioner was time barred from petitioning for IPR under 35 U.S.C. § 315(b). Judge Pauline Newman dissented.

CAFC Clarifies Infringement Analysis and Vacates a Finding of Noninfringement for Hulu

On May 11, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) affirmed the claim construction and decision of the United States District Court for the Central District of California to exclude evidence relating to damages but vacated its infringement determination and remanded a case alleging that Hulu, Inc. infringed Sound View Innovations, Inc.’s patent for data streaming technology. Sound View is the owner of expired U.S. Patent No. 6,708,213 (the ‘213 patent), which discloses “methods which improve the caching and streaming of multimedia data (e.g., audio and video data) from a content provider over a network to a client’s computer.” In June 2017, Sound View sued Hulu, alleging that its “Hulu Streaming Video on Demand products” infringed six Sound View patents, though only claim 16 of the ‘213 patent remained at issue on appeal.

CAFC Clarifies Experimental Use Exception, Reduces Damages in Partial Reversal of Sunoco Patent Infringement Win

On April 29, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) affirmed in part, reversed in part, vacated in part, and remanded a decision of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois regarding alleged infringement by U.S. Venture Inc., (Venture) of certain patents owned by Sunoco Partners Marketing & Terminals L.P., (Sunoco). Sunoco sued Venture, alleging that its operation of butane-blending systems infringed claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 7,032,629 (the ‘629 patent), 6,679,302 (the ‘302 patent), and 9,606,548 (the ‘548 patent). Venture counterclaimed, asserting that the patents were not infringed, were invalid and unenforceable. The district court ultimately awarded Sunoco $2 million in damages, which were trebled to $6 million. Venture appealed the district court decision challenging “(I) [the] rejection of its on-sale-bar defense, (II) [the] determination that it infringed two patents we have since held invalid, (III) [the] construction of two claim terms, and (IV) [the] decision to enhance damages.” On cross-appeal, Sunoco challenged the lower court’s decision not to grant its reasonable-royalty award or lost-profits damages.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Expresses Support for New Bills Limiting Power to Waive TRIPS Rights

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce yesterday published a letter it sent to members of congress expressing strong support for both the “No Free TRIPS Act” and the “Protecting American Innovation Act.” According to the letter, if enacted, these bills “would prohibit the Administration from negotiating or concluding any modifications to the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS) agreement, without the explicit authorization of Congress.” The Chamber is concerned about the potential impact of the proposed waiver of patent rights for COVID-19 vaccine technology. The letter comes after the European Union, United States, India and South Africa reached a compromise on language for waiver terms last month.